RIPPLES

RIPPLES

From Chicken Soup for the Entrepreneur's Soul

Ripples

The best way to predict the future is to invent it.

Alan Kay

Life’s an adventure.

If a psychic with a crystal ball had sat me down when I graduated from high school in 1970 and told me, “First you are going to be a scientist. Then you are going to be an attorney, and then you are going to be a publicist,” I’d have laughed my silly head off. That was the year I dropped out of college, hopped on a ten-speed bicycle, went cross-country through Canada and then hitchhiked around the country for a year.

I ended up going back to school, where after six years I got one degree, and then two years later another, and then landed a job working for the federal government as a hydrologist in the wilds of central Idaho.

And that’s how I found the world of publicity.

I wrote my first news release after getting sick on a little tiny microscopic bug called Giardia lamblia. I did some original research with federal funds and discovered that due to inadequate water treatment, there was a small-scale epidemic of Giardia going on in the western United States. To publicize the finding and help people deal with the situation, I wrote an article and sent out my very first news release. The first four words of that news release were, “Don’t drink the water!”

Here’s what happened next.

The local newspaper in Salmon, Idaho (circulation 2,700) published the article. I was interviewed by the Associated Press. That made a splash as the article was published in newspapers across the country, drawing attention to the disease and the risks of drinking wild-land water. They christened it “backpacker’s disease,” and it became pretty widespread knowledge that drinking out of streams and creeks was a risky thing to do.

It took ten years, but the U.S. government eventually passed regulations requiring upgrades to noncommunity water supply systems, and people drinking water from water systems in small towns all over America are now protected at a much higher level. And a couple of other things happened.

Woody Allen wrote a play. The title of it was Don’t Drink the Water.

A popular light beer company did a commercial that had two very good-looking Hispanic college students talking to one another, and one says to the other, “You can drink the light beer in America, but don’t drink the water.”

And I experienced the exhilarating feeling that comes from sending out a news release that causes ripples in human consciousness and shares knowledge with people from coast to coast.

It was the quest for this feeling that motivated me to create a news service to help people get their words out. I coined the business “Imediafax.” I would write news releases, and then I would send them out to custom-targeted media lists. Voila. People get publicity.

It’s a remarkable business. You get to work with some of the most creative and brilliant people in the world. It goes way beyond the fact that you can make money. It’s all about what happens when you give ideas to others.

I learned that I’m just here to help showcase and share their creative efforts and the fruits of their labor. That’s my role in life. There’s pleasure in getting to share so many good things in a way that can benefit so many others. In fact, the real satisfaction comes in seeing what happens. Some of the releases result in significant publicity in major media or noteworthy publicity on a national scale. Many of these are of broad general interest while others are industry-specific. Some publicity results in significant financial gain. Sometimes what a client seeks is public knowledge and political action.

My business took several years to create, day-by-day, word-by-word, release-by-release. It’s amazing to think that this business captures the best of the collaborative efforts of hundreds, if not thousands, of people. But it does.

And to this day, whenever I send out a news release for a client, I still get that feeling of throwing rocks in the pond and watching the ripples flow.

Paul J. Krupin

EPILOGUE: Paul J. Krupin is president of Direct Contact PR (formerly IMEDIAFAX: The Internet Media Fax Service). A custom, publicity service, Direct Contact PR sends out over a million news releases each year on behalf of hundreds of inventors, authors and publishing companies. Although he is experienced and works in numerous areas, Krupin’s work is most highly regarded in the independent publishing industry, and his expertise and book publicity achievements have been written about in dozens of books.

A retired federal government scientist and once-upon-a-time attorney, Krupin has been described as a longtime PR guru who has developed sure-fire, proven strategies for getting publicity. He works with individuals, companies and organizations, helping them write effective news releases and copy, then assists in selecting the desired deployment tactic to reach the right media. Krupin also offers a highly personal set of copywriting, consulting and custom-targeted news release distribution services.

Krupin is an author in his own right, with over twenty-five books to his credit, including the book Trash Proof News Releases (Direct Contact Publishing, 2001). His Web site contains numerous articles and a free download of this book.

To learn more about Krupin and his company, call 800-457-8746 or visit www.DirectContactPR.com.

Dahlynn McKowen

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