About This Book


The power of gratitude can change your life! In this collection of 101 true, inspiring stories, people just like you share how they turned their lives around for the better by seeing the silver linings, counting their blessings, and changing their perspective. Scientific research has proven that being thankful improves your health, your cognitive function and your relationships. You can learn to be a thankful person by actively practicing gratitude, by saying thanks, and by stopping and thinking about your blessings... even on a bad day. This book will inspire you to become a thankful person!

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Five ways to help you incorporate the power of gratitude into your own life Inspired by Chicken Soup for the Soul: The Power of Gratitude by Amy Newmark and Deborah Norville

Scientific studies have proven that being thankful can improve your health, your relationships, your career, and numerous other aspects of your life. Incorporating gratitude into your life makes you happier. Gratitude can be learned, too, and perfected through practice. Here are five tips that will help you find ways in which to incorporate the power of gratitude into your own life:

  1. You can age gracefully… and gratefully… by considering the alternative. When an esthetician told Connie Pombo that those dark spots on her hands were age spots, Connie was thrilled! While most women try to cover up signs of aging, Connie proudly showed off her wrinkles, gray hairs, and now, age spots, because they were proof of her beating cancer. “At age forty, I wondered if I would live long enough to see any signs of aging. I was in the battle of my life—fighting breast cancer,” Connie shares. Now 20 years cancer-free, Connie delights in any sign of getting older. “I’m not sure why anyone would want to take them away or make them disappear because they are—after all—long-awaited gifts,” Connie writes. “And I can see the beauty in all of them!”
  2. Saying thank you even in the face of disappointment can yield great benefits. Two months into a job that she loved, at an online university, Lindy Schneider was let go as part of a massive layoff. She and her husband had just moved to Colorado from Arizona, too. But instead of getting angry with her manager and department director for firing her, she graciously thanked them for the opportunity and noted that they must be having a tough day. Later that night, Lindy listened to a voicemail from a recruiter who said Lindy had come highly recommended from her former manager, and another online university had a position that would be perfect for her! “I had always thought of thank-you’s as little gifts that you give to others to brighten their day, gifts that are never returned,” Lindy says. “However, the day that I was hired to a new job just hours after being laid off, I knew that my gift of gratitude had been returned to me in abundance.”
  3. Making a daily practice of counting your blessings can change your life. Twenty-five-year-old Haylie Smart felt she was still waiting for her life to start. Unhappy, Haylie complained to her mom one day about everything wrong in her life. Then her mom asked her a simple question: “‘What if you only had today what you thanked God for yesterday?’” That changed Haylie’s whole perspective. “I realized that even though I wasn’t happy with some aspects of my life, there were many things I wouldn’t want to give up,” she shares. “I hadn’t taken the time to be grateful for them.” Every day from then on, Haylie wrote down five things she was grateful for in her life. She started to feel happy again. She began pursing her passions again. She found new purpose when she got involved in a fundraising and community involvement program. “I finally believed I had started my adult life,” Haylie says. “It’s amazing how much my life has changed since I started being grateful for all the things I never want to live without.”
  4. Remember to look for the silver lining. After years of hard work and studying, Amy Corron Power failed the Ohio bar exam by one point. Her disappointment was greater because she had missed spending time with her father while she was studying and now he was sick with cancer. “All that time away from Dad,” she writes. “For what? A law degree with no license. What good is that?” But having failed the Ohio bar, Amy moved back to Texas to live with her parents, spend time with her dad, and study for that state’s bar. When Amy passed the Texas State Bar exam, her father wasn’t well enough to attend her licensing ceremony, but there was “pride in his eyes.” A few weeks later, he passed away. “What a difference one point can make,” Amy shares. “One point more and I’d be a lawyer in Ohio, rather than Texas. But that one point gave me eight more months with my dad.”
  5. Saying thank you is a great way to remind you of the blessings in your life. Allison Hermann Craigie felt her life had upended. Shortly after her father died, her husband abruptly left her, and then her mother died. Suddenly she was a single mom of two special-needs children and struggling financially. She fell into a deep depression until one of the voicemails from her mother that she had saved hit a chord: “‘When you’re done licking your wounds, you’ve got to pick yourself up by the bootstraps.’” And that’s what Allison did—she got help and eventually found a job. “Gratitude returned to my vernacular,” she says. Now Allison and her children hold a Gratitude Party each year to thank the people who have had a positive impact on their lives in the preceding 12 months. “Although the Gratitude Party is a summation of the prior year, it is the daily practice of gratitude that keeps me moving forward,” she shares. “We maintain perspective and are thankful for the little things. We know very well that the little things are sometimes all we have and are quite often worthier than the big things.”
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