About This Book


Our dogs come in all shapes, sizes, and personalities. From goofy to guard, from hero to ham, and everywhere in between, our dogs are important and beloved members of our families. They can be so good, and then they can be not-so-good, but boy do they give us great stories! With an emphasis on stories about rescues, Chicken Soup for the Soul: The Dog Really Did That? will have owners of all breeds laughing, commiserating, and maybe even shedding a tear. These 101 heartwarming, humorous and completely true stories about our canine companions are sure to touch every dog lover's soul. After reading the stories in this book we know you’ll say, “The dog really did that?” The royalties from this book go to American Humane.

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Five ways to make the most of the dog in your life.
Inspired by Chicken Soup for the Soul: The Dog Really Did That?

The dog really did that? Yes, he did and you love him for it, whether he’s pulling off miracles or making mischief. From goofy to guard and from hero to ham, we’ve got the most amazing dog stories in Chicken Soup for the Soul: The Dog Really Did That? They’ll help you see your own dog with new appreciation for his or her intuition, compassion, and intelligence. Here are five ways to make the most of the dog in your life:

  1. Watch your dog make everyone and everything part of the family. While watching 2001: A Space Odyssey one night, Linda Zallen and her husband were amused by their Poodle’s interest in the ape-men. As soon as the characters appeared, Linda says, “Cody jumped up, got right in front of the TV, body tensed and alert with interest, and began to bark—a lot.” From then on, Cody was fascinated with animals that appeared on the screen, and with the television itself. He scrutinized it from all sides, trying to figure out where those animals were coming from, but ultimately he let it go. “He had made peace with it by accepting our television set as a friend,” Linda says. “From then on, when we went to bed each night, Cody gave each of us a goodnight kiss. And when he was done, he walked over to the TV and gave the screen a giant lick.”
  2. Enjoy your dog’s natural empathy. Her first day home after foot surgery, Gwen Cooper got out of bed and started using her crutches. Her Terrier, Buddy, stayed glued to her side, but he was only using three of his legs. He didn’t seem to have any pain, but he wouldn’t use that right rear leg. The vet took an X-ray and said there was nothing wrong. He suggested the dog was empathizing with Gwen. “We were astounded,” she says. “We had never heard of such behavior, but it was all the vet could come up with.” After nearly three months on crutches, Gwen moved into a walking boot. “The first day I was without crutches,” she says, “Buddy began using all four of his legs again.”
  3. Make your dog your fitness buddy. The vet gave Kathleen Gerard the bad news: Her dog Daisy needed to lose a couple of pounds. Kathleen, who had struggled with weight issues her entire life, took the doctor’s words to heart. She followed her sisters’ advice to become a “perimeter girl” and only shop the perimeter of the supermarket—where the fresh foods are kept. It wasn’t easy at first, but Kathleen and Daisy started sharing healthier meals and snacks. “We motivated each other, adding extra walks and even exercising together,” Kathleen writes. “Our progress was slow, but the pounds ultimately began to come off.” Best of all, Kathleen and Daisy were healthier and more energized! “With a more confident bounce in my step,” Kathleen shares, “I even stopped craving the junk food that used to trip me up.”
  4. Accept that dogs are natural health-care aides. Connie Pombo worried about caring for her husband, Mark, while he recovered from a shattered hip and broken femur. Their neighbor, Dave, a Marine, had adopted a Labrador Retriever named Sage after nearly losing a leg in an IED explosion. He sent the dog over to help Mark. Sage alerted Connie when Mark needed any kind of help. “Sage became commander-in-chief of bathroom duty and mealtimes,” Connie says, “even alerting me when Mark needed the television channel changed.” Sage stayed by Mark’s side for two weeks. “More than seven years have passed, and Mark has regained full use of his left leg,” Connie says. “It was all thanks to two brave Marines—one who served his country with honor with two tours in Afghanistan and the other with four paws who stood by his side and ours.”
  5. Trust your dog’s intuition. While Ellyn Horn Zarek’s dog Icey loved her family—her “pack”—she was an alpha dog who hated strangers. “She would growl at my children’s friends, bark at strangers, and guard her toys—and me!” Ellyn says. She never bit anyone, though. That is, until someone announcing himself as the gasman knocked at the back door. Ellyn went to let him in, but “Icey shot straight past me and sunk her teeth into the poor man’s calf,” she says. “In my arms now, Icey stared down the man and emitted a deep growl. The next thing I knew he was running away in his torn pants.” Worried about him, Ellyn called the gas company and learned the gas company hadn’t sent anyone to her address. They also said her visitor had worn the wrong color uniform—navy blue instead of Army green. “As I look back on that incident,” she shares, “I am sure Icey saved me that day from a robber or a rapist.”
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