About This Book


The moment a grandchild is born, a grandmother is born too. This collection of stories by grandmothers about being a grandmother, and by grandchildren about their grandmothers, celebrates these special relationships. With its personal stories about love across the generations, legacies and traditions, grandma's wisdom and lessons from grandchildren as well as the joys and challenges of grandparenting, this book will encourage, entertain, and enchant readers. Whether a grandmother to a two-year-old or to a twenty-year-old, these heartwarming, insightful, and humorous stories will captive her.

The moment a grandchild is born, a grandmother is born too. This collection of stories by grandmothers about being a grandmother, and by grandchildren about their grandmothers, celebrates these special relationships. With its personal stories about love across the generations, legacies and traditions, grandma's wisdom and lessons from grandchildren as well as the joys and challenges of grandparenting, this book will encourage, entertain, and enchant readers. Whether a grandmother to a two-year-old or to a twenty-year-old, these heartwarming, insightful, and humorous stories will captive her.

More from Chicken Soup for the Soul

We're adding this soon!

We're adding this soon!
We're adding this soon!
Five Tips for Grandmothers of all Ages

Inspired by Chicken Soup for the Soul: Grandmothers

By Jack Canfield, Mark Victor Hansen and Amy Newmark

With 101 stories of love, laughs and lessons from grandmothers and grandchildren, Chicken Soup for the Soul: Grandmothers offers grandmothers of all ages amusement and inspiration. Here are a few tips to help you enjoy life as a grandmother.

1. Silence is golden. When Sally Schwartz Friedman felt the inevitable urge to offer unsolicited advice to her three daughters, now mothers themselves, she would "practice primitive control devices like counting to ten." When her tactics failed, she would remind herself of the everlasting truth — they have to make their own mistakes to grow as parents. "Even though, once upon a time, you changed their diapers and taught them how to tie their shoes, they won’t listen to you anyway."

2. Remember the innocence of a child. When Barbara Brady overheard her granddaughter scolding her older sister for saying the "S" word she was appalled. The possibility of a six-year-old using such language caused her to jump to her feet and demand an explanation. It turned out the little girl was only referring to the word "stupid," not the four-letter word Brady assumed. In that moment, she realized the true "uncorrupted innocence of children."

3. Adapt to your grandchildren. B.J. Taylor envied her friends because of their close relationships with their grandchildren. Her grandchildren lived 2,000 miles away, making visits with them few and far between. A friend suggested communicating with the teenagers via e-mail. Now she "talks" with her grandson often and he is more forthcoming with information than ever before because he is comfortable using the computer as means of communication with loved ones rather than the telephone. Adapting to her grandson’s lifestyle allowed her to become much closer to him.

4. Experience new things with your grandchildren. When Bobbie Lippman agreed to do something "extra special" to celebrate her granddaughter Autumn’s birthday, she had no idea what she was getting into. Lippman had just consented to go skydiving. On the day of the big event, she arrived hoping there would be an age restriction that would disqualify her from participating — Lippman had no such luck. That day she experienced something brand new and exciting with her eighteen-year-old granddaughter. It was a day neither she nor her granddaughter would ever forget.

5. Have a sense of humor. When Alice Muschany had foot surgery, she was surprised and delighted that her grandson stopped by every day after school to see if she needed help. They would watch TV and play games together. Every afternoon before he left, her grandson would ask to use her computer. A few weeks later the visits stopped "as abruptly as they had started." Muschany’s daughter called to check on her and candidly spoke of her son’s grades improving because she’d taken away his "electronic privileges." In that moment, all Muschany could do was laugh. She realized that the reason for her grandson’s frequent visits was because of her Internet access!

We're adding this soon!

From Your Community

We're adding this soon!

We're adding this soon!

Story Titles and Authors