About This Book


This is the first Chicken Soup book to focus specifically on stories of faith, including 101 of the best stories from Chicken Soup's library on faith, hope, miracles, and devotion. These true stories written by regular people tell of prayers answered miraculously, amazing coincidences, rediscovered faith, and the serenity that comes from believing in a greater power, appealing to Christians and those of other faiths, and everyone who seeks enlightenment and inspiration through a good story.

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Five tips for renewing and strengthening your faith
Inspired by Chicken Soup for the Soul: Stories of Faith by Jack Canfield, Mark Victor Hansen and Amy Newmark


Life presents us with many obstacles: grief, separation, bad luck, uncertainty. Finding and holding onto faith can be difficult and sometimes seem impossible. The 101 stories from Chicken Soup for the Soul: Stories of Faith encourage us to have faith during even our darkest moments. Here are five tips for renewing and strengthening your faith.

1. Listen to your guardian angel. A car accident badly injured Toni Fulco and killed the man she loved. Toni grieved for John and the dreams they shared — he a doctor and she a teacher, they cared for children in a rural town. Now Toni faced life without John and in a wheelchair, unable to walk or teach. Encouraged by a visit one night from John's spirit, she worked at physical therapy. Her doctor though told her she wouldn't walk again and needed to accept that. Then that night, Toni woke to see John again. "John's softly glowing image kneeled at my feet and gently rubbed my legs until they tingled," Tony writes. He told her to get up and walk, and she did! Thanks to her guardian angel, Toni returned to teaching. "In each child's eyes, wide with wonder, I see my beloved John, smiling," she says.

2. Pray and watch for God's answer. One night at a Tuesday prayer service, Richard Whetstone thought of his son, Teddy, whom he hadn't seen in almost thirty years. Richard had divorced Teddy's mom when Teddy was a baby and they hadn't kept in touch. Richard had waived his custodial rights to allow his ex-wife's new husband to adopt five-year-old Teddy. "I loved Teddy and missed him terribly," Richard writes, "but I decided I couldn't interfere with a chance for happiness in his life." And now, decades later, Richard prayed to know his son. Later that week, Richard got a letter from Teddy — postmarked the day after the prayer service. Father and son corresponded, reconnected and finally met. "My Tuesday night prayer wasn't the first or the last prayer that God has answered in my life. But it is one of the most wonderful and satisfying blessings He has ever given me," Richard writes." All I did was simply ask, trusting for His answer."

3. Help others in need. When Mother Teresa came to speak near the city where Robert F. Baldwin lived, he knew he had to attend. Robert, editor of a Catholic newspaper, even got to meet Mother Teresa, but what she taught him that day was even more memorable. "Until that day, I had always thought of charity as simply being nice to people," Robert writes. "For Mother Teresa it was much more." She spoke about loving the poor and said that when we care for someone, we care for God. Soon after that memorable experience, Robert was leaving work when a drunk man — dirty and ragged — approached him and asked if the bus to a nearby soup kitchen had already left. It had. But then Robert remembered Mother Teresa's words, and saw a person who needed a meal. So Robert offered to give the man a ride. The man's reply echoed Mother Teresa's lesson: "Say," he said, "you must know me."

4. Believe in God's power. Richard H. Kiley was an American soldier fighting the Germans at the end of World War II. While camped in a small Belgian town, Richard, a Catholic, followed the locals to mass one Sunday morning. The priest didn't have an altar boy to help perform the mass, so 19-year-old Richard, still in uniform, stepped in. After the service, Richard saw the priest wore a German officer uniform under the priest's robes. Though the priest knew he had an American sergeant as an altar boy, Richard writes, the chaplain had given no outward sign of recognition during the mass. "Two strangers, enemies at war, had met by chance and for 20 minutes, without any direct communication, had found complete unanimity in an age-old ritual of Christian worship," Richard writes. "The memory of this incident has remained with me for over 50 years. It still brings the same elation, for I know firsthand that, even in war, our common humanity — under the same God — can triumph over hatred and division."

5. The best is yet to come. Dr. Roger William Thomas shares the story of Martha, one of the oldest and most faithful members of her congregation. When she learned she had six months to live, she met with Preacher Jim to discuss her funeral. Martha was calm, saying, '"I have lived a long life. I'm ready to go.'" And they matter-of-factly discussed what she wanted for her service. But one request struck the priest as odd. Martha wanted to be buried with her Bible in one hand and a fork in the other. Then she explained: Her favorite part of church dinners was at the end when the hostess would tell her to keep her fork — that meant dessert was coming! Martha knew people would ask about the fork and told Jim, "I want you to tell them that I kept my fork because the best is yet to come."

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