About This Book


This book focuses on issues specific to high school age kids, ages fourteen to eighteen. Teens in high school have mainly moved past worrying about puberty and cliques, so stories in this book cover topics of interest to older teens such as sports and clubs, religion and faith, driving, curfews, growing up, self-image and self-acceptance, dating and sex, family relationships, friends, divorce, illness, death, pregnancy, drinking, failure, and preparing for life after high school. High school students will find comfort and inspiration in the words of this book, referring to it through all four years of their high school experience, like a portable support group.

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Five tips for making the most of your high school years
Inspired by Chicken Soup for the Soul: Teens Talk High School by Jack Canfield, Mark Victor Hansen, Amy Newmark and Madeline Clapps

High school can be exhilarating, but it can be confusing, too. Everything changes, and you have lots of ups and downs in your daily life. But you are not alone. In Chicken Soup for the Soul: Teen Talk High School, teens share 101 stories of regrets and lessons learned, self-image and self-acceptance, family, relationships and more. Here are five tips for making the most of high school.

  1. Stand up for yourself. Mike Polanski's best and favorite track event was the 800-meter. At a meet against his friend Rick's school, Mike was excited to run until Rick and his friends approached just to make fun of him. They said that Mike's running shorts were too short and they ridiculed him. Mike was angry, but channeled his emotions into running a great race. He beat his former best time by 12 seconds and outran one of Rick's friends. After the race, Rick and his buddies still tried to bully him. But before they could, Mike shut them up, calmly saying, "All that matters is that I run, and I would gladly whoop your butt in the 800-meter any day."
  2. Don't be afraid to tell someone about trouble. When Aimee McCarron's best friend admitted to cutting herself, Aimee promised to help her, thinking she could fix her best friend. But when her friend kept cutting, Aimee realized they needed outside help. "I cannot do this myself," Aimee writes. "As much as it hurts me to not be able to help her myself, I realize that she needs help I can't give." So she went to a trusted teacher and together they went to the guidance counselor to figure out the next step. Aimee convinced her friend to talk to the guidance counselor. "That was the day the slow healing process began," Aimee says. "We know that we can get through anything, and that during times when we need it, it is more than okay to ask for help."
  3. Turn disappointment into opportunity. Sidelined from playing soccer her sophomore year because of a busted knee, Tanya Bermudez was disappointed and sulking. "Soccer was my pride, my core," she says. "Now I had nothing— no real future other than graduating high school, since I still wasn't sure if I wanted to go to college." But after an English essay she hastily finished in class received an A-, her teacher suggested she join the Academic Decathlon. Tanya did, and she actually had fun preparing for the big competition three months away. Competing against six other schools in her region, Tanya and her team took first place in the Super Quiz, and Tanya earned two other medals. "It turns out that when I lost the chance to play soccer, I found a new future for myself," she writes.
  4. Open up to the people who care about you. Junior year was supposed to be a great year for Chloe Scott, but her world crumbled when she learned her mom had cancer. She didn't know what to do and spent the night crying. Still upset the next day, she called to cancel her dinner plans with a classmate and found herself telling him the truth when he asked how she was. "All of a sudden, he was no longer just someone I went to school with. He was a friend," she writes. They met the next day for waffles and talked. "I don't remember every detail of that day, but I will always remember the true kindness and friendship he exhibited," Chloe says. "In many ways, it has been the worst year of my life…But the waffle day stands out in my mind as one of the saddest and greatest days of my life. It was the day I created the best support team I could have ever wished for."
  5. Step outside your comfort zone. Tia L. Napolitano went to prep school instead of her local public high school. When she did her admissions interview in eighth grade, she had the choice of commuting from home or living on campus. On one hand, the students she saw walking to their dorms seemed sophisticated, mature and completely comfortable at the prestigious school's beautiful grounds. However, boarding would mean leaving behind her best friend since childhood and her single-parent mom. Ultimately, she decided to board, and was glad she did. Tia fully immersed herself in a great education and made lifelong friendships and memories. "I opened my mind to a great adventure at age thirteen," she says of the day she interviewed at the school. "By doing that, I opened a door to countless other adventures that followed."
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