About This Book


A reissue of Chicken Soup for the Adopted Soul, this updated collection has even more heartwarming and encouraging stories — your favorites from the original, plus new bonus stories — all about the joy of adoption. Chicken Soup for the Soul: The Joy of Adoption will encourage and uplift you with its touching, personal stories about forever families and meant-to-be kids, with insight into what adoption is all about and what it's really like to be adopted. You'll be inspired by this special compilation that celebrates the bonds between parents and children.

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Five practical tips for adoptive parents

Inspired by Chicken Soup for the Soul: The Joy of Adoption, by Amy Newmark and LeAnn Thieman

Whether you are thinking about adopting, waiting for your child, or busily raising your adopted child or children, you probably have some questions. Chicken Soup for the Soul: The Joy of Adoption pulls together 101 stories from adoptive parents and adopted children, providing some great advice for parents as they wonder how to handle talking to their children about their backgrounds, their birth parents, and their futures. Here are a few recurrent themes that will help parents with these common issues:

  1. Listen to your "mother's intuition." Christie Rogers and her husband were going to have a closed adoption, so there would be no advance notice when their baby was born. But one Sunday morning, Christie woke up knowing that she would be sharing her birthday with her new child that week. Sure enough, they got the call on her birthday. Four years later, Christie nailed it again, predicting in November that she would have a baby by Christmas and then waking up one December morning and packing a bag for the baby. That afternoon, the phone rang and, you guessed it, Christie was right again. Christie says she had "a connection to my children before they were even born."
  2. Be matter-of-fact about your child's adoption. Mandy Houk never understood those sensationalized TV movies that depicted heartbreak and despair after a character learned he or she was adopted. It never made any sense. And why would it? She always knew she was adopted. It was never a big secret. The subject rarely came up at home, but when it did it was a happy one. She knew she was twice-loved — first by her birth mother who gave her an opportunity for a better life and then again by her adoptive parents and her sister, also adopted.
  3. Reassure your child that adoption is forever. Ellie Porte Parker's son Dmitry had a rough time adjusting to life with his new family after being adopted from Russia at age six. He was insecure about his place in the family and he acted out frequently. Things only got more stressful when Ellie's stepson Frank came to live with them, because Dmitry was afraid that he was being replaced by a better-behaving boy. But then the family added a wild, destructive puppy to the mix, and Dmitry saw his mother's commitment to keep the puppy no matter how poorly he behaved. He asked, "So you mean there's nothing Maverick could do that would make us send her somewhere else?" That's when he understood; they had both found forever homes.
  4. Over time your family may forget who's adopted. Cori Taylor and her sister were adopted from Korea by Caucasian parents. She couldn't imagine feeling any closer to them, even if they had been her birth parents. And her extended family apparently felt the same way. Cori recounts what happened one day when she was a little girl. At a big family dinner, when someone mentioned how she and her sister were adopted, her 10-year-old cousin stopped everything and exclaimed, "Wait! What? You were adopted!?"
  5. Let your child thank his or her birth mother. When the maternity nurse saw the full head of red hair on the newborn girl, she gasped and told the mother about her friend who had always dreamed of having a redheaded daughter. After determining that the nurse's friend was Jewish like her, the birth mother gave up the child, paid all the hospital bills, and disappeared. That red-haired girl, Marti Davidson Sichel, now 34, says she is filled with gratitude for her birth mother, who she considers "courageous and strong, able to make difficult choices." She thanks her birth mother in her story and describes how perfect her adoptive parents are for her, as if they were always meant to be together. Whether your child gets the chance to thank his or her birth mother face to face, in a letter, or in a Chicken Soup for the Soul story like Marti's, it's important to let your child express appreciation for the birth mother who gave him or her life and then made a loving sacrifice.
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