About This Book


Becoming a nurse is a calling — it's a tough job but a rewarding one. This collection of 101 personal stories will remind you why you became a nurse. All types of nurses share their experiences, their emotions, and even some great tips that will help you make a difference in the lives of patients and their families. Every nurse can use a little pick-me-up these days, and the stories in this book will encourage, inspire, and reassure you that your patients and their families appreciate your compassionate service.

More from Chicken Soup for the Soul

We're adding this soon!

We're adding this soon!
We're adding this soon!
Five Ways to Reignite Your Passion for Nursing
Inspired by Chicken Soup for the Soul: Inspiration for Nurses by Amy Newmark and LeAnn Thieman
Working in health care seems to be getting harder and harder, as nurses are expected to do more with less. Burnout, low morale and engagement issues can eventually affect patient care, but nurses show up day after day, night after night, selflessly ministering to others with their hands and their hearts. It’s a tough job, and it takes a special kind of person do to it. Here are five tips to reignite your passion for nursing, from Chicken Soup for the Soul: Inspiration for Nurses:
  1. Embrace your passion — after all, nursing is a calling.
    After leaving the Air Force, Larry Childers was studying civil engineering when he saw an ad in the Sunday paper: "Men Needed." Even though his wife pointed out that he couldn’t stand the sight of blood, and he had been accepted into the California Highway Patrol (CHiPs), Larry felt the call. He resisted the protests of some of his male relatives (it was the 1970's) and he enrolled in nursing school. Larry enjoyed his nursing career, working in rehabilitation, education, and the cardiac catheterization lab. But the real stories took place when he was off duty, responding to heart attacks, head gashes, playground mishaps, and ski injuries. Larry was always ready to answer the call.
  2. Remember that laughter is the best medicine.
    As a nursing instructor, Mary Lynn Harrison spent long hours teaching patient care and critical thinking to her students. In one case, she spent days tirelessly standing by the side of her student Amy, who was assigned to a disoriented 100-year-old skilled-nursing home resident. At the end of her last day of the clinical assignment, Amy was completing Ella's care while she jabbered on incoherently. When Amy asked Mary a question, Ella halted her ranting, looked at Amy, and yelled, "What the hell are you asking her for? She hasn’t done anything all week! All she does is stand there!"
  3. Let yourself heal patients and their families.
    Nurse Doug Dascenzo found his patient’s husband in a chair by his dying wife’s bedside, crying and trying to lean over to hold his wife. As the patient deteriorated, her husband appeared increasingly confused, distressed and detached. Insightfully, Doug asked, "Mike, would you like to sleep with her now, keeping her safe, warm and connected to you?" Within an hour of togetherness, the wife’s restlessness diminished and she required fifty percent less sedation. Mike rested too, feeling connected again. His healing had begun.
  4. Let your patients heal you, too.
    Ceil Ryan came to work Christmas Day with a forced smile and a homesick heart, but before she could say "Merry Christmas," patients were shaking her hand and sharing cookies. One said, "We saved you some treats!" and doled out fudge and fruitcake. Her last patient was a thirty-year-old man lying alone in the dark, desperately lonely. "Do you play poker?" Ceil asked. She found an old deck of cards at the nurse’s station, and between caring for her other patients she ducked into his room to play five-card draw… for paperclips. He had the cards dealt, and was smiling and ready to play whenever she came around. By the time the night shift nurses arrived, Ceil was filled with Christmas joy. She may have been the nurse, but that day her patients healed her.
  5. Open yourself to divine intervention.
    Elizabeth Carroll tried to keep Dianne as comfortable as possible, but her stage IV cancer had metastasized, resulting in constant pain. When her shift ended, Elizabeth said, "I will keep you in my prayers." Dianne only looked out her window. That evening, Elizabeth shared dinner and prayer with a friend. "Lord, I pray that you will run your fingers along Dianne’s spine and heal her of cancer." The next morning Dianne was beaming like a child on Christmas morning. "I felt you praying for me! So I started praying too. It was around nine o’clock, right?" Elizabeth nodded. "This sounds crazy, but I felt God touch me. And all the pain left. I haven’t taken any pain medications since!" Her doctor was astounded and he had no explanation. When you’re a nurse, expect miracles!
We're adding this soon!

From Your Community

We're adding this soon!

We're adding this soon!

Story Titles and Authors