This Week's Featured Stories

If you're looking for a laugh, a midday pick-me-up or a dose of inspiration, you'll love our featured stories. You can read three free stories every month by picking from the selection below or by searching through every Chicken Soup for the Soul story ever published using the box to the right. You can also have stories delivered right to your inbox with our free, featured story emails. If you'd like to have unlimited access and be able to choose the perfect story for any moment, sign up for a premium subscription and have the freedom to enjoy any of our 20,000+ stories any time!


Title:

25: Mamas Don’t Get Sick

Mamas Don’t Get Sick You can give without loving, but you can never love without giving. ~Author Unknown This has been the longest winter of my life. It started the day I remarked to a friend how healthy the kids had been. Now, I can’t remember a time when one of them wasn’t sick with something. They started with the nasal cruds. They all had it and passed it back and forth for a few weeks. It traveled from their sinuses to their chests and back again. We played musical humidifiers and bought Kleenex by the case. From there we had a bout with a relentless stomach thing. We went from forgetting what the inside of our pediatrician’s office looked like, to a standing appointment every Monday. (What is it with sick children and weekends?) About the time we were back on solid foods, we began our strep throat marathon. Every few days, just as I began to breathe a sigh of relief, I’d hear the words I’d come to dread. “Mommy, my throat hurts.” But through it all, I’d managed to keep myself well. And, at last, I could see the light at the end of the tunnel. The kids were back in school and the baby was on a semi-normal schedule. That’s when it hit me! The flu! I can’t do this, I thought. I’m the one who keeps this... (more)
Tired of browsing? Click here for a random story.
Title:

26: My Nights in a Tent

My Nights in a Tent How glorious a greeting the sun gives the mountains! ~John Muir Once a year my husband and I enter that storage unit most of us have called the “garage,” to revisit all those treasures we thought we just couldn’t live without. He wants to throw out those bottles I have saved for the day I might make flavored oils. I want to toss those small jars he saves for that oddball screw, nut and bolt. We anguish a little, laugh a lot, and end up pitching it all. Then there’s that shelf with all the camping gear we never use. The Coleman stove for wonderful outdoor cooking, the coffee pot for hot chocolate, the special toaster that fits on the grill, the sleeping bags, and of course the tent made for two. My husband grew up camping. His stories are colorful and fun. They are fun to hear, but I think my allergies act up just listening to stories about being one with nature. Every year I feel guilty as he scans the shelf, looking at it with such longing. I immediately start planning our next vacation to Europe, Hawaii, Mexico, a cruise… anything to take his mind off that tent. For many years I’ve dodged the word camping. Last year the guilt finally set in. I poured a glass of wine, took a deep breath and told my husband I’d love... (more)
Title:

27: Along Came Leonard

Along Came Leonard Success in marriage does not come merely through finding the right mate, but through being the right mate. ~Barnett R. Brickner My first adventure as part of a couple lasted thirty-three years and was a traditional marriage for its time (Dick and I were married in 1953). He commuted to work in the city while I taught school in our neighborhood. When I became pregnant with our first child I retired, because “a mother’s place is in the home.” Dick agreed with me. In our world, daddies earned the money and mommies took care of all things domestic — the cooking, cleaning, laundering, childraising, and nursing whoever was sick on any given day. Mommies didn’t get sick — they never had the time. Because we’d both grown up with this model, my husband and I felt comfortable with the pattern and it worked for us. Dick’s advances in his career were not considered his alone. They were our victories. His disappointments were not his setbacks, they were ours. We thought of ourselves as a single unit. When he died, I felt like half of me had died with him. Life went on. It had to. But I didn’t believe I would ever be whole again. Food lost its taste — talking to an empty chair over dinner added no flavor. There... (more)
Tired of browsing? Click here for a random story.
Title:

28: Bright and Shiny

Bright and Shiny Gratitude is the best attitude. ~Author Unknown As Christmas approaches, I usually start hinting to my husband about potential gifts for me. I’ll say things like, “Gee hon, that’s a lovely necklace they have over at the mall.” Or, “There are a ton of new books at Barnes & Noble I’d love to read.” But over the years, I have learned that this tactic is not an effective one. For many years I struggled to understand my husband’s lack of ability to understand “hints.” Was he just being stubborn? Were the items too expensive? Did he need to have his hearing checked? It was last Christmas, when I finally began to understand my husband. Under the Christmas tree, was a large box wrapped with beautiful holiday paper. I was stunned. What could it be? I was pleased that my husband had finally thought of me. He wrapped the present slowly and carefully. This was unusual as gifts from my husband usually come in plain envelopes or white plastic shopping bags. Was it a music box, a snow globe or perhaps a lovely figurine? “Nope,” my husband said. I would just have to wait to find out. On Christmas morning, I eagerly opened the present to see what my thoughtful husband had so carefully selected for me. I... (more)