50: Lightning Strikes Twice

50: Lightning Strikes Twice

From Chicken Soup for the Soul: Tales of Golf and Sport

Lightning Strikes Twice

To be upset over what you don’t have is to waste what you do have.

~Ken S. Keyes, Jr.,
Handbook to Higher Consciousness

During a round with friends on March 18, 1990, seventy-four-year-old Margaret Waidron of Jacksonville, Florida, approached the par-3 seventh hole.

Legally blind, Waldron had lost her vision ten years earlier to an eye disease. Instead of giving up sports, though, she continued to be an active golfer, relying on her husband, Pete, to line her up and to describe the hole, distance and playing conditions.

Pete handed Margaret a 7-iron and pointed her toward the flag on Long Point’s eighty-seven-yard seventh hole. “I hit the ball solidly,” Margaret recalled. “One of my friends said, ‘Good hit, Margaret... Wow! It’s going for the green! It’s going toward the hole!’”

“Another friend shouted, ‘You’ve got a hole-in-one!’ We all hugged and I felt a great sense of fulfillment. That night, Pete and I celebrated.”

When Margaret arrived at the same hole the next day, she took the same 7-iron and once again hit the eighty-seven-yard shot perfectly. The ball rolled into the cup for another ace. “When we went back to the clubhouse, I was so proud,” Margaret said. “I don’t consider myself handicapped. I am challenged to do the best I can with what I have. What else should I do? Sit home and knit? Not me!”

Experts have computed the odds against an amateur scoring a hole-in-one at twelve thousand to one, and no one yet has attempted to establish the likelihood of a blind golfer recording an ace. “To do it twice on the same hole, two days in a row, using the same club and the same ball, makes the odds beyond comprehension,” said Long Point golf pro Ed Tucker.

~Bruce Nash and Allan Zullo
Chicken Soup for the Golfer’s Soul

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