UN-THANKED PEOPLE

UN-THANKED PEOPLE

From Chicken Soup for the Soul Celebrates Teachers

UN - THANKED PEOPLE

When William Stidger taught at Boston University, he once reflected upon the great number of un-thanked people in his life. Those who had helped nurture him, inspire him or cared enough about him to leave a lasting impression.

One was a schoolteacher he’d not heard of in many years. But he remembered that she had gone out of her way to put a love of verse in him, and Will had loved poetry all his life. He wrote a letter of thanks to her.

The reply he received, written in a feeble scrawl of the aged, began, “My dear Willie.” He was delighted. Now over fifty, bald and a professor, he didn’t think there was a person left in the world who would call him “Willie.” Here is a copy of that letter:

My dear Willie,

I cannot tell you how much your note meant to me. I am in my eighties, living alone in a small room, cooking my own meals, lonely and, like the last leaf of autumn, lingering behind. You will be interested to know that I taught school for fifty years and yours is the first note of appreciation I ever received. It came on a blue-cold morning and it cheered me as nothing has in many years.

Not prone to cry easily, Will wept over that note.

She was one of the GREATEST UN-THANKED PEOPLE from Will’s past. You know them. We all do. The teacher who made a difference. That coach we’ll never forget. The music instructor or Sunday school worker who helped us to believe in ourselves. That Scout leader who cared.

We all remember people who shaped our lives in various ways. People whose influence changed us. Will Stidger found a way to show his appreciation—he wrote them letters.

Who are some of the un-thanked people from your past? It may not be too late to say, “Thanks.”

Steve Goodier

[EDITORS’ NOTE: “Un-Thanked People” was broadcast by William L. Stidger on his nationwide radio program, Getting the Most Out of Life, aired by NBC from 1937 to 1940 and later published in Sermon Nuggets in Stories, Abingdon-Cokesbury Press, 1946. Stidger’s grandson, Jack Hyland, recently published a biography entitled Evangelism’s First Modern Media Star: The Life of Reverend Bill Stidger, Cooper Square Press, 2002. (www.stidger.com).]

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