Angel in the Air

Angel in the Air

From Chicken Soup for the Military Wife's Soul

Angel in the Air

I feel we are all islands in a common sea.

Anne Morrow Lindbergh

In February 2003 my husband was given leave to fly to Georgia and help me move cross-country to our new duty station in Texas. This was during the time of the War on Terror, when the threat of war with Iraq was beginning to look like a reality. Protestors were coming together all over the world. People were expressing their views in newspapers, proclaiming that they had no pity for the troops. My brother-in-law was already serving in Afghanistan, and we were uncertain whether or not my husband would be deployed to the Middle East. Suddenly, I didn’t feel like the sacrifices we were making for our country were worth it.

He had been sent to Texas with little warning and sent back to Georgia with not much more. He didn’t have any civilian clothes with him, so, when he boarded the plane, he was dressed in the daily “BDUs,” camouflage clothes. As he got off the plane, one of the flight attendants handed him a small piece of paper. It read:

When you stepped onto my airplane you brought tears to my eyes. My little brother is currently a U.S. Army soldier serving in Kuwait, and, just by chance, our last name is Johnson also. I appreciate your presence and wish you nothing but the best. You are a hero to me, and I thank you for all that you are.

God bless! From the bottom of my heart, know you are loved.

Your thankful flight attendant,
Shannon Johnson

I read this note over several times, each time fighting back tears a little more. I’ve never known how to express exactly what that letter did for me. But, after reading it, I knew that my husband was appreciated, that our struggle wasn’t going unnoticed. I knew that I shared that struggle with so many other military spouses and family members, and I no longer had to carry that burden alone.

Ramiah Johnson

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