Three Wheels of Hope

Three Wheels of Hope

From Chicken Soup for the Latter-day Saint Soul

Three Wheels of Hope

And see that ye have faith, hope, and charity, and then ye will always abound in good works.

Alma 7:24

I had an unusual dream where, as an adult woman, I was trying to ride a child-sized tricycle. I was in a race of some kind, and was trying to balance the awkward little tricycle down a narrow, dark street. The street was a familiar one from my childhood hometown of Charlestown, Massachusetts.

People were hanging out of their apartment windows on both sides of the narrow street screaming down at me, “Just give up, you fool! You’ll never make it with that little bike.”

I kept telling them repeatedly, “All I have is this three-wheeled tricycle.” I struggled to steer and kept tipping to the side, but I kept my balance and ignored the people who were mocking me as I slowly pedaled by.

Then at one point a man left his home and ran out into the middle of the street. He got right into my face, forcefully screaming and mocking me. He raised his hands over his head and yelled, “YOU’LL NEVER MAKE IT, YOU FOOL. JUST GIVE IT UP!” He continued screaming repeated words of discouragement right in my face.

“This bike will take forever at the speed you’re going!” he screamed.

I boldly replied, “I must push forward; I must get to the finish line!”With great strength, I awkwardly pedaled past him and ignored all his mocking words, leaving him and his words behind.

I held on as tightly as possible and steered straight ahead with great determination. I had unshakable faith that I would make it! I also knew it didn’t matter how long it would take, because I knew it was worth it.

At that point, the dream came to an abrupt end.

I awoke on the chilly November morning and remembered the dream very clearly. I also remembered that the night before I was feeling discouraged—but now I felt happy and peaceful, and my spirit felt alive with hope. The dream had given me inspiration to struggle on, no matter how difficult life gets.

I dressed quickly for work and reflected on the dream nonstop until I got to my desk and recorded it. I prayed earnestly to know its meaning—I knew it was an important dream that I was supposed to share with others.

I think we’ve all been given small tricycles as adults, and we struggle to balance our lives down the dark, narrow streets of mortality. The world wants us to give up and wants us to think we should have it better than a tricycle. Obviously, I would certainly prefer a ten-speed bike so I could glide easily through life—but then how could I learn to be humble and rely on Heavenly Father?

I now consider the tricycle to be my three wheels of hope, and this narrow path I struggle on will lead me to Heaven someday if I’m faithful and true. The dream has given me courage and hope that I will finish the race inch by inch. I know I must never give up, but press forward always.

Susan Durgin

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