About This Book


Tough times won't last, but tough people will. Many people have lost money and many are losing their jobs, homes, or at least making cutbacks. Many others have faced life-changing natural disasters, such as hurricanes and fires, as well as health and family difficulties. Chicken Soup for the Soul: Tough Times, Tough People is all about overcoming adversity, pulling together, making do with less, facing challenges, and finding new joys in a simpler life. The stories in this book will remind us that we are all going through tough times but we are tough people and we will survive.

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Inspired by Chicken Soup for the Soul: Tough Times, Tough People

By Jack Canfield, Mark Victor Hansen and Amy Newmark

As cliché as it may sound, there’s truth to the phrase "when the going gets tough the tough get going," and right now times are tough. When the economic climate feels more like a storm, how do you stay motivated and ambitious? Inspired by contributors to Chicken Soup for the Soul: Tough Times, Tough People, these are a few ways to leap over the hurdles in your life:

1. Don’t be your own worst enemy. It’s easy to blow a frightening situation out of proportion, which can often cause the problem to become even worse. When Jennifer Lee Johnson began receiving calls from four credit card companies, all of whom she owed money, she panicked. "[The credit card charges] all started when I was a freshman in college. And so, I found myself three years later, hiding from my telephone afraid to open my mail and unsure of how to help myself." When Jennifer opened her bills she realized that the fees where not as bad as she thought they would be, but they would have been even less if she had tackled the credit card bills earlier. Don’t be afraid to face the music, sing along with it. It you don’t address a problem it may get bigger.

2. Jobless doesn’t mean payless. There are lots of ways to make money without having a conventional job. In order to make money Renie Burghardt’s grandfather began weaving and selling baskets. It wasn’t long before he not only sold out of baskets but offered weaving lessons as well. Renie recalls when his grandfather first began weaving, "A large crowd gathered around to watch him, and some boys volunteered to get more willow branches for him." There are many talents and skills you have that you could apply to make some cash, you just may not know what they are yet.

3. A penny saved is a penny earned. It may not seem like much, but every nickel is still money. Don’t simply leave change under the couch or tell yourself "it’s only a dollar more." Those quarters and dollars can quickly ad up. Irene Budzynski was able to pay for her groceries by saving the money she collected from recycling soda cans. " I edged over into the brush and noticed all the cans on the ground. I could cash each container for a nickel," Says Irene, “Soon there were dozens of cans rattling around to redeem for enough money to buy a gallon of milk!" By picking dimes off the ground or recycling old newspapers you might be surprised at your wallet’s growth.

4. There’s nothing to fear. We often let our own fears hold us back from our accomplishments. If there is something you wish to pursue, do it! Karen Myers was once too scared to do anything athletic. She would tell herself, "I am afraid of looking awkward, of falling down, of drawing attention to myself." But once she put aside her fears Karen found pride in every injury she faced, "I am fond of the purple hue on my skin — I did something to earn that bruise." When looking for a new job or pursuing a new career there will be some hits along the way. But don’t let these discourage you, remember what doesn’t kill you will make you stronger. And you might find new passion along the way, such as Karen’s new found love for boxing.

5. If it’s broke, fix it. People spend a lot of money every year on home repair, or rather hiring someone to fix a problem for them. Cut out the middle man and fix the sink yourself. "Even though my husband and I had three university degrees between us, we had almost no knowledge or experience in construction," Jennifer Quist recalls, "Since that beginning, we’ve kept researching, kept saving, and kept expanding out repertoire of construction skills." Not only will you save money by fixing things yourself, but you’ll be able to help out your friends and family. Soon you’ll have more money and you’ll be everyone’s best friend!

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