About This Book


This is the first Chicken Soup book, with 101 great stories from Chicken Soup's library, created specifically for Christian parents to read themselves or to share with their children. All of the selected stories are appropriate for children and are about raising Christian kids twelve and under. Christian parents will enjoy reading these heartfelt, inspiring, and often humorous stories about the ups and downs of daily life in today's contemporary Christian families, written by other Christian parents.

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Five Ways to Teach Your Children Good Values

Inspired by Chicken Soup for the Soul: Christian Kids by Jack Canfield, Mark Victor Hansen, and Amy Newmark

Storytelling can be a great way to teach your children lessons about morals and good behavior. Chicken Soup for the Soul: Christian Kids is a collection of the best stories for Christian kids from the first 15 years of Chicken Soup for the Soul books. Reading the stories is not only a way for parents to spend quality time with their kids, but can also serve as a great conversation starter for parents to talk to their kids about important issues. Here are five of the many lessons your children can enjoy learning from this book.

1. Help them understand the true meaning of giving. Seven-year-old Michele Wallace Campanelli couldn’t wait for her pastor and his wife to visit her family’s home for dinner. It was a week before Christmas and she wanted to give her pastor a gift. She remembered his son had played "Little Drummer Boy" at the Christmas concert earlier that month, so she wrapped up a small wooden drummer boy ornament for him from their tree. After she gave him the gift, her parents told her it wasn’t lavish enough to give the pastor. The following Sunday at church Michele was too embarrassed to look at the pastor, but to her surprise, the pastor preached about her gift and how it reminded him that the most important part of giving is the love behind it. "That ornament was so tiny, but the meaning became larger than life to me," Michele writes. "I learned at seven years old that it’s not the gifts themselves that are important; it’s making someone happy, and being willing to show love by sharing, that represent the true spirit of giving."

2. Teach them that we all have a place in heaven. As a child, Joyce L. Rapier found a bird with broken wings. She waited until her father came home, hoping that he could save the bird, but the bird had already passed. Joyce’s father explained that its wings were already fixed, and that the hidden wings, wings that everyone has, had flown it to heaven with Jesus. Joyce never really understood her father’s words until many years later when her mother passed away. "The years faded from her face to reveal a beautiful glow, almost stating perfection has arrived," Joyce says. "It was as though I could feel her spirit swirl around me, dancing with excitement. She was at peace and, strange as it might seem, so was I." Several years later, she watched her father pass away in a nursing home, as a gospel choir down the hall sang, "When they ring those golden bells for you and me, I’ll fly away, oh glory, I’ll fly away in the morning, when I die, hallelujah, by and by, I’ll fly away." At that moment, Joyce knew there was a heaven.

3. Show them the power of kindness. At 10, Bethany Couts hated her job delivering the local newspaper. It was lonely, and she never interacted with her customers. One day, a new address was added to her route. A five-year-old boy greeted her. Each day he would say hello with a smile and after she gave him the paper, he’d say thank you three times in a singsong voice. Sometimes the boy would give her gifts or share his mom’s homemade cookies with her. Over the years, they became great friends. "My ‘little buddy’ taught me many things. The radiant smile that never left his face taught me how far a simple gesture can go," Bethany writes. "His presents taught me that big things really do come in small packages. And his hugs taught me that even the most insignificant jobs in life can mean something to someone."

4. Let them know God will always protect them. When Sylvia Boaz Leighton was five, she shared a bedroom with her twin brother. Every night he would call to her from the top bunk, saying that the bogeyman was coming. One night, Sylvia was so scared that she called for her father. Instead of getting mad at her brother, her father brought her a picture of Jesus and taped it over her bed so that Sylvia could see it. He told her that she never needed to be afraid of anything because Jesus was always with her. "The next night the usual bedtime ritual was followed, and I had my eyes on my Shepherd and the lamb," Sylvia says. "When the lights went out, the bogeyman was out in force. ‘OOOOOOOOOH! It’s the bogeyman, and I’m going to get you!’ With a quivering voice I announced, ‘God will protect me.’"

5. Demonstrate the power of prayer. Dorothy M. Hill’s older daughters were sad when they found out their four-year-old sister accidentally smashed the egg their pigeons had been sitting on. That night, the little girl apologized and said that she prayed to God to send another egg. A few moments later, an egg appeared in the cage! The family was shocked, but she was serene. Dorothy writes that her daughter said, "I told you. I prayed to God, and God laid an egg."

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Story Titles and Authors