About This Book


Dating and courtship, romance, love, and marriage are favorite Chicken Soup topics. Women, and even men, love to read true stories about how it happened for other people. This book includes the 101 best stories on love and marriage chosen from a wide variety of past Chicken Soup books. These heartwarming stories will inspire and amuse readers, whether they are just starting to date, are newly wed, or are veterans of a long marriage.

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Five Tips for Living Happily Ever After

Inspired by Chicken Soup for the Soul: Happily Ever After by Jack Canfield, Mark Victor Hansen and Amy Newmark

Is there a secret to a happy marriage or lasting relationship? You’ll read how men and women of all ages found their own true love in Chicken Soup for the Soul: Happily Ever After. These 101 true tales of love will both inspire you and give you great ideas for finding and/or keeping your soul mate. Here are five of the many ways to live happily ever after from the stories in this book.

1. Never give up on true love. Arnold Fine never imagined that returning a man’s lost wallet would bring together two long-lost lovers. The wallet only had three dollars and a letter from 1924, telling the recipient that she couldn’t see him anymore. Arnold found the woman in a nursing home, and later discovered the man lived in the same nursing home! Neither of them had ever married. Arnold re-introduced them, and three weeks later they got married, at ages 76 and 79. "A perfect ending for a love affair that had lasted nearly 60 years," Arnold writes.

2. Be creative. Matthew Cummings had been dating his girlfriend for six years. Throughout their relationship, he had never succeeded in surprising her. "So I embarked upon a personal journey to find a unique and special way to pop the question," he writes. He combined her love of reading and her favorite childhood animal, the pig, to write a storybook about two pigs that paralleled their story and ended with the male pig proposing to the female. With the help of a talented artist, he completed the entire book in secrecy. She read through the whole thing and happily accepted his proposal. On the last page, there was an illustration of pigs dressed in a wedding gown and tuxedo. "It read, in appropriate storybook fashion: ‘Emmy and Matty lived happily ever after.’"

3. Pay attention to the motivation behind your spouse’s actions. After a fight with his wife about his bad eating habits and high cholesterol, Rusty Fischer took out the trash. The bag broke open and he discovered low-fat food containers that had been emptied and then refilled with his usual, fattening foods – greasy potato chips spilled out of low-fat potato chip bags, for example. His wife had swapped his regular foods for healthier versions and re-used the old packaging! "Maybe she really did want me around for the rest of her life, after all," thought Rusty, and he surprised her by going to the twilight movie showing that he always declined attending with her. He was "still amazed at how much effort she’d made to keep me healthy and how much she loved me," Rusty writes. "It was more like a new beginning."

4. Trust in fate. Dick Osborn had just been dumped. Testing fate, he asked God questions while flipping a coin to get the answers. He noticed an advertisement on the back of a magazine for the book Parables for Young Teens, by Susan F. Titus. He asked God if he would marry the author, and for the first time, got a head’s up for yes, even though he didn’t know her. Months later, he had forgotten about the ad on the magazine and he began dating someone new. Eventually they became engaged. One day, he noticed the cover of Parables for Young Teens framed on a wall in her house. She was the author, whose name he had forgotten! It wasn’t until they were on their honeymoon that Dick told Susan the story.

5. Go the extra mile. Gwyn Williams’ great-grandfather Ben was single, working at a railroad camp of civil engineers and living the nomadic life. He longed for a companion. When word got out that the boss’s single sister-in-law was coming to visit, all the men planned to wait at the station for her arrival. Ben knew that if he wanted a chance with her, he’d have to do something special. So the night before her arrival, Ben slipped away from the camp to the train stop before their town’s station. The next morning, when the two got off the train, arm-in-arm, all of the men in Ben’s camp were shocked. He had walked seventeen miles to meet her before the other men. Ben continued to court her until they eventually married. Gwyn never got to meet her great-grandfather, but she loved to hear her great-grandmother’s story "of how she was so pretty that once, on the basis of a tintype, an entire camp turned out to meet the train and vie for her attention. It was the story of how one man walked seventeen miles, all night long, for a chance to meet the woman of his dreams and claim her for his wife," Gwyn writes.

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