About This Book


How often have you seen a teenage girl pretend to be perturbed, but secretly smile, when she is told that she acts or looks just like her mother? Fathers, brothers, and friends shake their head in wonder as girls "turn into their mothers." This book contains the 101 best stories from Chicken Soup's library on the mother-daughter bond. Mothers and daughters will laugh, cry, and find inspiration in these stories that remind them of their mutual appreciation.

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The ties that bind: Five ways to bond with your daughter.

Inspired by Chicken Soup for the Soul: Like Mother, Like Daughter

By Jack Canfield, Mark Victor Hansen and Amy Newmark

You’ve witnessed her first steps and shared her joy over winning the championship game. As life’s moments turn into lasting memories, how can mothers continue to strengthen their relationship with their daughters? Inspired by Chicken Soup for the Soul: Like Mother, Like Daughter here are some ideas to get the most out of your mother/daughter relationship:

1. Cheer them to success. Mothers are often required to play the role of cheerleader, and it is comforting to know that they are our biggest fans. For Caurie Ann Miner, her mother’s wisdom shined best in her daily notes she left on napkins in Caurie’s lunchbox. As she shares her joy over finding a loving and encouraging napkin note on her first day of kindergarten, Caurie recalls how these notes sustained her throughout her life in her story "Lessons on Napkins." Help your children build positive self-esteem and encourage them by leaving an inspirational note on their door before a test, or by making a sign to cheer them on at a basketball game. These little messages and mementos will mean the world to them, just as they did to Caurie.

2. Make a video diary. Where are you storing years of school, soccer and dance recital pictures? Are they still serving as a dust magnet in the attic? Break them out and create a video diary for your daughter. Surprise your child for her birthday or special occasion with a DVD that contains special pictures, music and videos that tell the story of her life from birth to the present. Most computers come with software to make videos or a presentation creation program. Don’t know how to use these programs? Ask a friend for help or enroll in a community computer class. Learning something new will be rewarding and you and your daughter will love this special memory.

3. Cook together. Whether your daughter is a seasoned chef or a kitchen misfit, she’ll enjoy the opportunity to learn a new dish and spend time with you. As you hone your cooking skills, discuss memories of the favorite meals you shared together or funny stories of cooking disasters. For Annmarie Tait, her mother’s love of coleslaw caused her much angst as she recalls in her story "Queen of Coleslaw." Since it was tradition to have homemade treats at school to celebrate a birthday, Annmarie feared her mother would show up with an industrial-sized tub of coleslaw on her special day. Of course, she brought cupcakes instead, but looking back, she thinks one of her best memories is watching her mother make her coleslaw. To help you make your own cooking memories with your daughter, make a personalized cook book for her that contains all of the recipes she loves.

4. Don’t criticize, make suggestions. You’ve probably heard sighs and mumbled replies from your daughter in your weekly lunches or phone conversations. It may be time to switch up your strategy for giving advice to your loved ones. In "Cellular Love," Amy Lederman offers her story of how she began to think of her mother’s suggestions as loving comments rather than nagging nuisances, after experiencing motherhood. Whether you wish your child would eat less, or make better grades, how you approach the topic could ultimately weaken or fortify your relationship. Offer to share new healthy recipes, provide study tips to work on together or give loving advice when she has a fight with her boyfriend.

5. Explore your artistic side together. As the Fourth of July approaches, take time to teach your little one about our nation’s birthday. Encourage them to make flags out of construction paper, fashion paper lady liberty crowns and torches or get the entire family involved with a reenactment of the signing of the Declaration of Independence. Have a parade in your backyard and encourage them to decorate their favorite bikes and toys with red, white and blue streamers and flags. Just like Karen Majoris-Garrison learned in Chicken Soup for the Soul: Like Mother, Like Daughter, the best memories are made when you spend time with your loved one, because soon your little girl will be a woman.

The ties that bind: Five ways to bond with your daughter. Inspired by Chicken Soup for the Soul: Like Mother, Like Daughter

By Jack Canfield, Mark Victor Hansen and Amy Newmark

You’ve witnessed her first steps and shared her joy over winning the championship game. As life’s moments turn into lasting memories, how can mothers continue to strengthen their relationship with their daughters? Inspired by Chicken Soup for the Soul: Like Mother, Like Daughter here are some ideas to get the most out of your mother/daughter relationship:

1. Cheer them to success. Mothers are often required to play the role of cheerleader, and it is comforting to know that they are our biggest fans. For Caurie Ann Miner, her mother’s wisdom shined best in her daily notes she left on napkins in Caurie’s lunchbox. As she shares her joy over finding a loving and encouraging napkin note on her first day of kindergarten, Caurie recalls how these notes sustained her throughout her life in her story "Lessons on Napkins." Help your children build positive self-esteem and encourage them by leaving an inspirational note on their door before a test, or by making a sign to cheer them on at a basketball game. These little messages and mementos will mean the world to them, just as they did to Caurie.

2. Make a video diary. Where are you storing years of school, soccer and dance recital pictures? Are they still serving as a dust magnet in the attic? Break them out and create a video diary for your daughter. Surprise your child for her birthday or special occasion with a DVD that contains special pictures, music and videos that tell the story of her life from birth to the present. Most computers come with software to make videos or a presentation creation program. Don’t know how to use these programs? Ask a friend for help or enroll in a community computer class. Learning something new will be rewarding and you and your daughter will love this special memory.

3. Cook together. Whether your daughter is a seasoned chef or a kitchen misfit, she’ll enjoy the opportunity to learn a new dish and spend time with you. As you hone your cooking skills, discuss memories of the favorite meals you shared together or funny stories of cooking disasters. For Annmarie Tait, her mother’s love of coleslaw caused her much angst as she recalls in her story "Queen of Coleslaw." Since it was tradition to have homemade treats at school to celebrate a birthday, Annmarie feared her mother would show up with an industrial-sized tub of coleslaw on her special day. Of course, she brought cupcakes instead, but looking back, she thinks one of her best memories is watching her mother make her coleslaw. To help you make your own cooking memories with your daughter, make a personalized cook book for her that contains all of the recipes she loves.

4. Don’t criticize, make suggestions. You’ve probably heard sighs and mumbled replies from your daughter in your weekly lunches or phone conversations. It may be time to switch up your strategy for giving advice to your loved ones. In "Cellular Love," Amy Lederman offers her story of how she began to think of her mother’s suggestions as loving comments rather than nagging nuisances, after experiencing motherhood. Whether you wish your child would eat less, or make better grades, how you approach the topic could ultimately weaken or fortify your relationship. Offer to share new healthy recipes, provide study tips to work on together or give loving advice when she has a fight with her boyfriend.

5. Explore your artistic side together. As the Fourth of July approaches, take time to teach your little one about our nation’s birthday. Encourage them to make flags out of construction paper, fashion paper lady liberty crowns and torches or get the entire family involved with a reenactment of the signing of the Declaration of Independence. Have a parade in your backyard and encourage them to decorate their favorite bikes and toys with red, white and blue streamers and flags. Just like Karen Majoris-Garrison learned in Chicken Soup for the Soul: Like Mother, Like Daughter, the best memories are made when you spend time with your loved one, because soon your little girl will be a woman.

Soul sisters: Five ways to bond with Mom

Inspired by Chicken Soup for the Soul: Like Mother, Like Daughter

By Jack Canfield, Mark Victor Hansen and Amy Newmark

Have you ever had the feeling that you are "turning into your mother?" Each generation leaves its mark upon the next, whether you’re a proud grandmother, fun-loving mom, or grateful daughter. Inspired by Chicken Soup for the Soul: Like Mother, Like Daughter here are some ideas to get the most our of your mother/daughter relationship. Who knows? Maybe turning into your mom can be fun, after all!

1. Learn from her. In your teen years, what once mortified you about your mother may now be cause for inspiration, as Sylvia Rosa-Casanova has learned. In her story "Things I Learned from My Mother," Casanova remembers her embarrassment when her mother ironed shirts for extra money. Now, she admires her mother’s offbeat innovation. "I search to find a similarity with the woman who taught herself to read and write, and who was the best darned small-appliance repairman on La Salle Street," says Rosa-Casanova. Whether it’s ironed shirts, a giving heart, or incredible patience, challenge yourself to adopt the best qualities your mom has to offer.

2. Plan a spa day. We don’t all have the money to treat ourselves to a mani-pedi or a hot stone massage. But you can treat you and your daughter (or mother) to at-home spa treatments. Most face masques, deep conditioning treatments and pedicures can be done using household ingredients, like sugar and cucumbers. As you relax and cleanse, entertain each other with funny memories or ask your mother to tell you stories from her childhood. Just like many contributors in Chicken Soup for the Soul: Like Mother, Like Daughter, you may be surprised by what you discover.

3. Go on a "staycation." You don’t need to go on a tropical vacation to reconnect with your loved ones. Why not plan a mother-daughter "staycation?" Approaching your time together as a vacation will adjust your mindset. And clearing your schedule will allow you plenty of time with mom. Spend a weekend at a nearby hotel, and do the tourist things that local residents never dream of: peruse your local museum, enjoy a fancy brunch, or go thrifting at those off-the-wall antique shops.

4. Have adventures — and push through fears. Coordinating busy schedules may seem like a daunting task, but try and make some time to meet with your mother each week. For Judy Henning, a mother-daughter rock climbing adventure turned into a moment neither would soon forget. In Henning’s story "Climb On," she recalls her panic while perched on a cliff: a sudden pain in her abdomen, where she had surgery for cancer months prior, gripped her with fear. But as her daughter coaxed and encouraged her to keep going, she regained her composure and continued to climb. Now whenever Henning and her daughter are face with a problem, they encourage each other to climb on and push through their troubles.

5. Rough it. If you’re not an outdoorsy type, never fear: Camping, backpacking, and fishing don’t have to be scary when you’re doing them with Mom. As Lin Sutherland writes in her story "Catfishing with Mama," sometimes your mother’s kooky skills – like blood baiting catfish – offer opportunities for her to show off. By allowing your mom to do what she does best, you’ll gain a better appreciation for the neat woman who raised you.

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